active sound research

During performance or sound event, writing and sound recording are a presence within contextually social and monetary use of the body and its energy. Should a storyteller chose not to be recorded, another may choose to tell the story as their own memory. Universal standards can hardly be afforded to technicians, clerics, and future archivists should writers, workers, or researchers expect (at more than one time) to validate or question how sound and memory will become interpretative.

Consider how much time and energy is required for a sound recording to occur. About 3 hours for the narrator, many more for a sharp and honest interviewer. Recording technology devices or computers, even common appliances — capable of recording moments, memories, and alternatively simple and complex telling of stories — are widely available.

Respectfully conducted and open methods of research must correspond with every interviewer’s personal integrity. During the interviewee’s process of sharing, speaking, and remembering, the story belongs to no one else.

In the age of  interactive operating systems and many, many opportunities to record with digital media, our chosen  devices cannot guarantee sound and memory to be protected during use or future storage. Should insightful data and sound recording techniques be available, what are the reoccurring consequences of competitive, predatory, and multinational business between borders, languages, and geopolitical body date?

It is the responsibility of each interviewer to prepare research and conduct interviews that help question the narrator’s era and never their personal character or timeline of historical memory.  With great questions come great narratives. Active sound research calls upon interviewers to navigate the many demands of the sound recording genre to guarantee that narrators  be comfortable, respected, and well recorded for future listening.

About

Public History at New Mexico State University: Poverty, Homelessness, and Hunger in the New Mexico Borderlands. Email record@nmsu.edu Phone (505) 715-8779

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