Saint Luke’s

Saint Luke’s mission includes the core values of Compassion, Accountability, Respect, Excellence, and Service.  The featured logo will soon be replaced by a newer, rebranded logo to introduce the grand opening of Amador Health Center.

Peer support specialist at Saint Luke’s Health Care Clinic, James Sassak comments on the dangers of trauma brought on by harmful psychological duress after emergency care and hospitalization, being ticketed and indebted with trespass charges which may result in failure to appear warrants, and the problem of being identified as homeless.

Later in the conversation, James offers the potential solution of Homeless Court Programs to help resolve these issues in Las Cruces.

Listen:

Hope Stories 003 –– 1h 42m.  Recorded 29 March 2018 at Jardin de Los Niños La Paz Room on the Hope Campus.

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Jardin de Los Niños

Executive Director of Jardin de Los Niños Audrey Hardman-Hartley, recipient of the John Paul Taylor Social Justice Award, speaks about the Dogs Who Read program and early education in New Mexico.

Defining therapeutic intervention developmental screening, Audrey outlines new 2018 health and human service resources available on the Community of Hope Campus.

Listen:

Hope Stories 002 –– 1h 37m. Recorded 9 March 2018 at Jardin de Los Niños La Paz Room on the Hope Campus.

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Camp Hope

Facilitator of the Great Conversation, Randy Harris shares the importance of community dialogue and collaborative problem solving.  To learn more, visit a 5 May 2014 Give Grande fundraiser post which features The Great Conversation mission statement at the Hope Village blog.

Listen:

Hope Stories 001 –– 1h 30m. Recorded 2 March 2018 at Jardin de Los Niños La Paz Room on the Hope Campus.

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Research Questions

Can the American home and workplace become sensible, inclusive, and accessible to human beings without recourse from bad credit, zombie debt, and the historical threat of cyclical individual and familia poverty?

How do individuals, small groups, and municipal organizations apply ethical methods and means to synthesize public health resource?

How can communities creatively approach legibility and self awareness campaigns to make available services more viable, and thereby increase access to localized healthcare?

Can sustainable living arrangements between individual citizens and city, county, and state support systems address New Mexico’s current and future needs?



In conjunction with the importance of self-care, vital mental health corridors of crisis intervention, and resources for domestic violence –– can individual cities in New Mexico overcome the historical distinction of the fiftieth poorest state through coordinated approaches to sustainable health care?

Can New Mexicans feed, clothe, and house those experiencing poverty, homelessness, and hunger in both rural and urban environments?



The American workplace, with the home as nearby as possible, cries out for reasonable and sustainable functions of livability.  Clear and commonplace human-systems understanding may help more people without over-stressing service providers.  More easily accessed safety corridors of healthcare services, longterm housing assistance programs, and beneficial employer relationships with educational opportunities work toward maintaining equitable prosperity.



What benefits can community gardens offer to home-owners, renters, and the homeless?

Can homes be constructed with communal labor, supplies, and sustainable maintenance into the future?

How does mental health and wellbeing play a role in attaining sufficient workforce income to pay for a home or a monthly rent payment?



Is homelessness dependent on the circumstances of the individuals and their families, or due in part to the conditions of the state?

Finally, what causes and symptoms create poverty, homelessness, and hunger in New Mexico, and does state social services provide for the needs of both rural and urban New Mexicans?

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Hope Stories Question List

Questions design general outlines and intentions for the Hope Stories project, a working guideline to consider how a single interview might progress.
Hope Stories Questions’ lists seek rapport with potential narrators, greater access to memory recall, and to prepare for the day of the interview.
The list linked above changes with each narrator’s background, field of specialization, and according to the personal story each individual narrator chooses to share.

Suggested subjects, personal events, and specific questions for conversation are always encouraged.  For more information about working together, and developing questions for the story you would most like to tell, Contact me by phone or email with questions, thoughts, and comments.

All recordings begin with a short introduction which details interview location, date, and anyone who may be present other than the narrator and the interviewer. In addition to the digital file- name of the recording, the interview begins when the narrator states:


Full name
Location considered hometown 
Current role or recent advocacy at Mesilla Valley Community of Hope


Biographical

Will you share a story about growing up

Where did you go to school –– What career did you imagine for yourself

Talk about highlights of your personal biography before Mesilla Valley Community of Hope –– Education, Travel, Business, Volunteerism

Talk about the Mesilla Valley Community of Hope and Doña Ana County services that matter most to your work

 

Hope Stories

What is your perspective on finding and keeping long-term employment in Las Cruces

How did you first experience what today is commonly called a “tent-city” or “homeless youth” or “soup-kitchen” or “health clinic” or “food pantry”

Discuss differences between sanctioned and unsanctioned tent-cities

How can community support help or hinder success for the homeless

Talk about the benefits of transitional housing programs like Tents-to-Rents––            Complications

Discuss some of the challenges of maintaining health when experiencing homelessness

Which clinical services and healthcare programs help the homeless to access food and shelter

Hope New Mexico

Tell me about services and resources outside Camp Hope that work –– those that do not

How do access services to public housing differ throughout the State of New Mexico and the City of Las Cruces

What is your knowledge of poverty and hunger in rural areas of the state

Have you worked with Community of Hope clients from New Mexico Colonias

What is your knowledge about New Mexico’s transition between the traditional federal Food Stamp Program and today’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

In your experience, have programs like New Mexico’s use of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) helped avoid homelessness

Hope Work

How do City, State or Federal funding programs play a role in your work

Can you talk about specific city or state institutional challenges of helping people who are living at Camp Hope

Discuss some of the challenges of maintaining health when experiencing homelessness

Which clinical services and healthcare access programs help the homeless access food and shelter

Are soup kitchens vital to the homeless community

Hope Care

In your own daily and weekly routine, what methods of self-care work best

What programs are you aware of that help to alleviate the stress that can occur for those working to help the homeless

Are there employer, city, or state systems which support your healthcare

Do you have a retirement program as part of your work

Hope Future

Do future programs show promise to help the homeless in Las Cruces

Name three of the most valuable contributions or levels of support, not present today, that would help the homeless in Las Cruces immediately

How do you envision the future of the Mesilla Valley Community of Hope

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Mesilla Valley Community of Hope Stories

This project explores human rights, access to services, and city resources as seen through the experiences of staff, community advocates, and city officials at Mesilla Valley Community of Hope (MVCH).  The New Mexico State University Public History based project seeks to document those who have worked to mitigate community issues including yet not limited to:

  • Poverty
  • Homelessness
  • Child Hunger
  • Public Health

My intention as interviewer at Mesilla Valley Community of Hope:

To collect oral history interviews of MVCH staff, advocates, and city officials who have contributed to the ongoing success of the community. Interviews are limited to 120 minutes, held in agreed upon and pre-scheduled settings, and voluntary.

To participate in the project, all potential narrators must be a current MVCH staff member or volunteer, or an approved community advocate whose work has directly contributed to the success of the five collaborating organizations located on the

Hope Campus:

Should time permit, MVCH contributing sponsors may be considered for short, 30 minute or less interviews outlining participation to the community.

Additional interviews may be considered for other contributing organizations in the area, such as the Las Cruces Gospel Rescue Mission and the NMSU Aggie Cupboard; however, the core of the project’s focus highlights the Hope Campus.

As a potential narrator, please review the following declaration of research documents which includes the required Informed Consent signature pages. A specific set of potential interviewee questions will be made available soon.

Please contact David Lee with any questions, thoughts, or comments.

Thank you for your kindness and patience in consideration of the Hope Stories project.

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Podcasts ‘R’ Us?

Podcasts pose challenges beyond the historical applications of analog oral history methodology.  Pre-interview etiquette, in-depth narrator research, closely monitored sound recording levels and interviewing techniques all continue to be valuable skills of born-digital oral history collection; however, as the Oral History in the Liberal Arts website points out: Choosing a Digital Tool to Visualize, Oraganize, and Publish Interview Collections is an important consideration at all stages of project development.  As every seasoned sound editor knows from too little planning too late: the sooner the better.

Douglas Boyd’s Survey of Oral History Podcasts —like most things Dr. Boyd has endeavored to share on the internet — is an invaluable link for those under the impression that widespread podcasting use has passed its prime on the internet.


It should be clear that both professional and amateur historians have access to the tools of podcasting.  As we progress into the future of New Mexico, like many other states, remember that such access is often dependent on digital literacy and Wi-Fi availability initiatives in rural and underserved areas.  It should not be a surprise that not everyone under the sun has access to the internet.  To learn more about broadband internet service in New Mexico, check out the New Mexico Broadband Map from the Office of Broadband & Geospatial Initiatives. 


 

Rising legions of storytellers, such as Humans of New York, continue to redefine oral history as a medium of the people.  Closer to home, Humans of New Mexico follows this lead with its own brand of community based public history.

Regardless my own lone-wolf tendencies, Oral History, like podcasting, truly works best from a collaborative, interdisciplinary, and open source approach.  It is crucial to credit everyone involved on a project, and especially to remember that positive workflow is contagious to future success.

Another insight: keep in mind that your own success may influence others to adopt certain aspects of your work— this is a good thing.  Use your workflow magic, or lose it.


Workflow is one of the most challenging aspects of collection and preservation of oral history recordings.  In order to develop a connection intended audiences, consider and plan how to display your interviews for others to listen to online.


 

Kate Brenner’s website Amplify: The Oral History Podcast Network helps to serve this need for clarity by presenting podcast methods alongside oral history practice, an encouraging call for post-production balance before interviews rather than after.

One last note in time for America’s most contested holiday of privileged class leisure, the Story Corps Great Thanksgiving Listen explores oral history and podcasting on a macro level experience.  Despite recent reports of sound and production worker unionization after complaints of inadequate compensation, it is difficult to criticize Story Corps without recognizing its potential to democratize public history access, and to show how everyday people can record and document their own story.

Regardless postproduction funding and community support,  everyone should have access to oral history, podcasting, and storytelling from the heart.

Good Luck!

 

 

 

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