Thesis

Can the American home and workplace become sensible, inclusive, and accessible locations?

Do contributing individuals, small groups, and municipal organizations commit their efforts to ethical methods and means to synthesize public health resource, creatively expand legibility and self awareness campaigns of quality available services, and thereby increase healthcare access for everyone?

Can sustainable living arrangements between the individual citizen and city, county, and state support systems rise to address America’s current and future needs?

Plainly, will adnaseum nationalistic and democratic principles of a just and equitable society be exposed for the false storybook narrative that itself is created and sustained through the political processes of the twenty first century.

The American workplace, with the home as nearby as possible, cries out for reasonable and sustainable functions of livability, clear and commonplace human systems understanding, and more easily accessed safety corridors of healthcare services, longterm housing assistance programs, and employer relationships with the labor force who works to maintain fiscal prosperity.

Are community gardens available to each home-owner or renter? Can homes be constructed with communal labor and supplies? Does drug and alcohol addiction prevent someone from a home without proper case worker intervention? How does mental health and wellbeing play a role in attaining sufficient workforce income to pay for a home, or a monthly rent payment including utilities? Should every single individuals be expected to provide such income as contributors to the system based upon the data that appears to prove that they exist? What is the purpose of ownership in the community? Does ownership provide access to public health, or it really just a stigmatized status symbol — like the perception of the costumed homeward bound Hobo — and quite aside today’s problem of the have-not and the have-everything?

Property Rent is a form of indentured servitude. Land tenor is important; however, how does ownership of personal property misconstrue responsibilities between tenants and landlords?

Is homelessness a product of the individual or the conditions of the state?